Press Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact: Christine Gauvreau

(860) 757-6525

Christinne.Gauvreau@ct.gov

 

Contact: Robert Kinney

(860) 757-6668

Robert.kinney@ct.gov

 

 

Date: February 27, 2017

 

NEWS

 

Newly Digitized Historic Newspaper Tells about the Fight for African American

Civil Rights in Connecticut, 1894-1904

 

(HARTFORD)- Librarians digitizing the New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier (1880-1907) have come upon approximately three dozen news stories about an important African American organization called the State Sumner League of Connecticut.  Founded on August 22, 1894, the State Sumner League of Connecticut had thousands of members. The members who were in leadership played a major role in key national efforts to fight lynching and the enactment of Jim Crow laws in the South. The league was also heavily involved with the effort to desegregate public accommodations in Connecticut. The purpose of the league was explained in the (Journal and Courier, Aug 23, 1894), “as the improvement and advancement of the colored citizens of Connecticut to the end of healthy and material progress—politically, socially, intellectually, and morally”. The organization specifically urged the “full enjoyment of every civil right without distinction on account of birth, race, or previous social status.”

 

The League’s first president, the bootblack J.P. Peaker, would later become an executive committee member of the National Afro-American Council (1898-1907) and a speaker at the historic 1898 Cooper Union meeting called in response to the Wilmington, North Carolina race riot of that year.  As part of its regular work, the League organized state tours of prominent national African American leaders, such as New York Age editor Thomas Fortune and Richmond Planet publisher John Mitchell, Jr.

 

Coverage of the annual meetings at Savin Rock, the numerous speaking tours, and other activities of the state and local chapters of the Sumner League can be found in the digitized newspaper for a ten year period, from the 1894 founding until 1904.  These articles can be retrieved by searching the free Library of Congress historic newspaper database called Chronicling America.  There, these stories about African American Gilded Age Connecticut from the Journal and Courier can be easily contextualized by viewing them side by side with related articles from  key African American newspapers also found in the database.  For this period, these include the Richmond Planet, the Washington Bee, the Saint Paul and the Minneapolis Appeal.  The national prominence of Connecticut activists in the period between the end of Reconstruction and 1905 can now be more fully documented.  For more information about the Sumner League and its place in the national movement, see “Connecticut African American Activists Found the Sumner League,” August 2, 2016 at ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org.

 

###

 

The Connecticut State Library, which includes the State Archives and the Museum of Connecticut History, contains extensive collections documenting the history of Connecticut and its families.  The Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut that provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services to citizens of Connecticut, and employees and officials of all three branches of State government.  The Library is open, free to the public, Tuesday – Friday 9-5 and Saturday from 9-2.  The Museum of Connecticut History is open Monday – Friday 9-4 and Saturday from 9-2.  Visit the State Library at www.ctstatelibrary.org | http://ctstatelibrary.org/museum-of-ct-history/ | http://twitter.com/LibraryofCT | http://www.facebook.com/CTStateLibrary | http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctarchives/

 

The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor (http://www.neh.gov). The National Digital Newspaper Program http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-program  grants support the creation of a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1690 and 1963, from all states and U.S. territories. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this database do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Gail Hurley

(860 704-2222)

Gail.Hurley@ct.gov

Date: January 31, 2017

Connecticut State Library Announces Availability of Newly Digitized New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier 1895-1908

 

(Hartford, CT) The Connecticut State Library is pleased to announce that it has digitized the New Haven Daily morning journal and courier from 1895-1907 and its successor The morning journal-courier 1907-1908.  These and other historically significant newspaper titles are being digitized in collaboration with the National Digital Newspaper Program.  The scanning of the new titles is made possible by an award for $250,000, the second received, from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

 

Martha Brogan, City Librarian and Director, New Haven Free Public Library says, “Our patrons are always interested in online access to historical newspapers, especially for New Haven newspapers. This release covers 1895 to 1908, expanding our offerings by several years. These years in New Haven were marked by thriving industry, a burgeoning population, and civic pride, influenced by the City Beautiful movement that resulted in the building of our public library. Expanding coverage to some of our neighboring communities newspapers is likewise a great addition.”

 

In 1892, the Daily Morning Journal and Courier, published by the Carrington newspaper dynasty, was said by the county historian John L. Rockey to be the largest daily in the city and a “reliable paper, whose politics are Republican.”  As such, it covered business, the courts, civic affairs, entertainment, and social news in one of Connecticut’s most rapidly expanding cities. Thus, it will be of interest to family historians, historians of New Haven history and teachers looking for Connecticut primary sources.

 

The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Board selected New Haven’s Morning Journal and Courier from 1880-1908, the Newtown Bee, from 1877-1909, and the Waterbury Evening Democrat from 1887-1908.  When complete, the digital images from these newspapers will be included in the Library of Congress’ newspaper site: Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/.

 

 

This project builds on the completion of the digitization of the 1909-1922 Bridgeport Evening Farmer and Norwich Bulletin, a project that was made possible by an earlier NEH grant.  The State Library also created the Newspapers of Connecticut project [http://is.gd/Oy4T68], a website which has runs of more than 90 titles from 1821-1947 and includes more than 7000 issues from 39 towns.

 

###

 

The Connecticut State Library, which includes the State Archives and the Museum of Connecticut History, contains extensive collections documenting the history of Connecticut and its families.  The Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut that provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services to citizens of Connecticut, and employees and officials of all three branches of State government.  The Library is open, free to the public, Tuesday – Friday 9-5 and Saturday from 9-2.  The Museum of Connecticut History is open Monday – Friday 9-4 and Saturday from 9-2.  Visit the State Library at www.ctstatelibrary.org | http://ctstatelibrary.org/museum-of-ct-history/ | http://twitter.com/LibraryofCT | http://www.facebook.com/CTStateLibrary | http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctarchives/

 

The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor (http://www.neh.gov). The National Digital Newspaper Program http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-program  grants support the creation of a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1690 and 1963, from all states and U.S. territories. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this database do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

 

 

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Gail Hurley

(860 704-2222)

Gail.Hurley@ct.gov

 

Date: January 25, 2016

NEWS

Connecticut State Library Announces Next Set of Newspaper Titles to be Digitized

The Connecticut State Library is pleased to announce that it has chosen three newspaper titles to be digitized as a result of an additional award for $250,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to continue digitizing historically significant Connecticut newspapers through the National Digital Newspaper Program.

The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Board selected New Haven’s Morning Journal and Courier from 1880-1908, the Newtown Bee, from 1877-1909, and the Waterbury Evening Democrat from 1887-1908.  The digital images will be included in the Library of Congress’ newspaper site: Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/.

State Librarian Kendall Wiggin said that “as the major repository of Connecticut Newspapers, the State Library is committed to broadening access to the rich history found in Connecticut’s newspapers.” He added that “with this latest installment of newspapers now digitized, the State Library is able to shine a greater light on an important period in Connecticut’s and the nation’s history.”

The State Library has already worked with digitizing newspapers, with the recent digitizing of the Bridgeport Evening Farmer and Norwich Bulletin, which was made possible by the earlier grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  The State Library has also worked with its Newspapers of Connecticut http://is.gd/Oy4T68. project, which has short runs of approximately 90 titles from 1821-1929, for more than 7000 issues from 33 towns.

###

The Connecticut State Library which includes the State Archives and the Museum of Connecticut History contains extensive collections documenting the history of Connecticut and its families. The Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut that provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services to citizens of Connecticut, and employees and officials of all three branches of State government.  The Library is open, free to the public, Tuesday – Friday 9-5 and Saturday from 9-2.  The Museum of Connecticut History is open Monday – Friday 9-4 and Saturday from 9-2.  Visit the State Library at www.ctstatelibrary.org | http://ctstatelibrary.org/museum-of-ct-history/ | http://twitter.com/LibraryofCT | http://www.facebook.com/CTStateLibrary | http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctarchives/

The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor (http://www.neh.gov). The National Digital Newspaper Program http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-program  grants support the creation of a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1836 and 1922, from all states and U.S. territories. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this database do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

————————————————————————————-

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Gail Hurley

(860 704-2222)

Gail.Hurley@ct.gov

 

Date: October 7, 2015

 

NEWS

The Connecticut State Library Celebrates Its Contributions to Chronicling America’s 10 Million Pages

 

Free, searchable database of historic newspapers reflects Connecticut history

The Connecticut State Library today joins the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities in celebrating a major milestone for Chronicling America, a free, searchable database of historic U.S. newspapers. The Library announced today that more than 10 million pages have been posted to the site.  Connecticut’s contribution includes news from over 100 towns and neighborhoods from Putnam to North Stonington in the east and from Greenwich to West Cornwall in the west, as covered by the Norwich Bulletin and the Bridgeport Evening Farmer/Bridgeport Times from 1909-1922, two titles digitized by the State Library’s Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project (CDNP). Launched by the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in 2007, Chronicling America provides enhanced and permanent access to historically significant newspapers published in the United States between 1836 and 1922. It is part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a joint effort between the two agencies and partners in 40 states and territories.

 

The NDNP awards grants to entities in each state and territory to identify and digitize historic newspaper content. Awardees receive NEH funding to select and digitize 100,000 pages of historic newspapers published in their states between 1836 and 1922. Uniform technical specifications are provided to ensure consistency of all content, and digital files are transferred to the Library of Congress for long-term management and access. The first awards were made in 2005. Since then, NEH has awarded more than $30 million in support of the project.

 

The Connecticut State Library was awarded their first 2-year grant from NEH in 2013 and digitized 105,000 pages of Connecticut newspapers.  A second 2-year grant was awarded this summer to digitize another 100,000 pages.  The CDNP Advisory Board is working on title selection and hopes to announce the chosen titles soon. “This has been a tremendous opportunity for Connecticut to contribute our state story to this growing window on our nation’s history,” said State Librarian Kendall F. Wiggin.

 

“Chronicling America is one of the great online treasures, a remarkable window into our history and a testament to the power of collaborative efforts among cultural institutions nationwide,” said Mark Sweeney, the Library’s Associate Librarian for Library Services. “The Library of Congress is proud to work alongside NEH and all our partner institutions to make this vision a growing reality. In the coming years, we look forward to adding newspapers from the remaining states and territories, as new partners join the program.”

 

“We at the National Endowment for the Humanities are proud to support the Chronicling America historic newspaper project,” said NEH Chairman William Adams. “This invaluable resource preserves and makes available to all the first draft of America’s history so that we can see the ideas and events that shaped our republic unfold in the headlines of their times.”

 

While newspapers are frequently available for general use through microfilm and can be shared among users by interlibrary loan or purchasing copies, digitizing pages and providing full-text keyword access to the content is transformative for research of all kinds. In addition to saving researchers hours of scrolling through reels of microfilm, full-text access allows users to discover connections between research topics and uncover little-known stories in American history. The Chronicling America site includes a broad, curated set of newspapers selected for their historical value that users can browse or search. Through a few clicks they can narrow their focus to newspapers published all on the same day, in the same region, or the entire country. In addition, the content in Chronicling America is available for bulk download and API use, fostering new research approaches through computational and linguistic analysis.

 

Chronicling America Facts:

  • Between January and December 2014, the site logged 3.8 million visits and 41.7 million page views;
  • The resource includes more than 285,000 pages in almost 100 non-English newspapers (French, German, Italian and Spanish);
  • More than 250 Recommended Topics pages have been created, offering a gateway to exploration for users at any level. Topics include presidential assassinations, historic events such as the sinking of the Titanic, inventions, famous individuals, and cultural or offbeat subjects such as fashion trends, ping-pong and world’s fairs;
  • NEH has awarded a total of more than $30 million in grants to 40 partner institutions to contribute to Chronicling America, listed at http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/awards/

 

About the Library of Congress: Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress is the nation’s first-established federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world. It seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs, publications and exhibitions. Many of the Library’s rich resources can be accessed through its website at loc.gov.

 

About the National Endowment for the Humanities: Celebrating its 50th anniversary as an independent federal agency in 2015, National Endowment for the Humanities brings the best in humanities research, public programs, education, and preservation projects to the American people. To date, NEH has awarded $5 billion in grants to build the nation’s cultural capital – at museums, libraries, colleges and universities, archives, and historical societies – and advance our understanding and appreciation of history, literature, philosophy, and language. Learn more at neh.gov.

 

About the Connecticut State Library: The State Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut. The State Library provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services to citizens of Connecticut, as well as the employees and officials of all three branches of State government. The Connecticut State Archives and the Museum of Connecticut History are components of the State Library. Visit the State Library at  http://www.museumofcthistory.org/  |   http://twitter.com/LibraryofCT | http://www.facebook.com/CTStateLibrary | http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctarchives/

————————————————————————————-

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Contact: Gail Hurley
(860 704-2222)
Gail.Hurley@ct.gov

Date: August 12, 2015

Connecticut State Library Receives New Grant for Newspaper Digitization

The Connecticut State Library is pleased to announce that it has received a supplemental award of $250,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to continue to digitize historically significant Connecticut newspapers through the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) over the next two years. This grant brings the total award amount the State Library has received for the project to $524,034. The digital images will be included in the Library of Congress’ newspaper site: Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/.

“At a time of limited state resources and increasing citizen interest in accessing Connecticut’s history electronically, this grant award will greatly assist the State Library in its efforts to make more of the historical record available to anyone with Internet access” said State Librarian Kendall Wiggin. Wiggin also noted that it is a tribute to the hard work of the project team that Connecticut has been awarded this second grant.

Following the NDNP guidelines, the grant will allow Connecticut to add another 100,000 pages, digitized from microfilm of newspapers published in the state between 1836 and 1922. An advisory board consisting of an historian, a journalism professor, an educator, a digital content curator, a librarian, and an archivist will select the newspapers to be scanned.

With the earlier NEH grant, the Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project (CDNP) http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/ has digitized and made available through Chronicling America the Norwich Bulletin and the Bridgeport Evening Farmer from 1909-1922. http://1.usa.gov/1MGXmtZ. The State Library’s Newspapers of Connecticut site http://cslib.cdmhost.com/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15019coll9 is currently adding newspapers contributed by local libraries and, in time, will incorporate the CDNP newspapers.

###

The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor (http://www.neh.gov). The National Digital Newspaper Program http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-program grants support the creation of a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1836 and 1922, from all states and U.S. territories. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this database do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The Connecticut State Library which includes the State Archives and the Museum of Connecticut History contains extensive collections documenting the history of Connecticut and its families. The Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut that provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services to citizens of Connecticut, and employees and officials of all three branches of State government. The Library is open, free to the public, Tuesday – Friday 9-5 and Saturday from 9-2. The Museum of Connecticut History is open Monday – Friday 9-4 and Saturday from 9-2. Visit the State Library at www.ctstatelibrary.org | http://ctstatelibrary.org/museum-of-ct-history/ | http://twitter.com/LibraryofCT | http://www.facebook.com/CTStateLibrary | http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctarchives/

 

————————————————–
BEF Lusitania 1915-05-08Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project Digitizes Bridgeport Evening Farmer, 1910-1916

[Originally posted on May 8, 2015]

The Connecticut State Library is pleased to announce that it has digitized the Bridgeport Evening Farmer from January 1, 1910 – October 31, 1916 as part of a grant received from the National Endowment for the Humanities to digitize historically significant Connecticut newspapers. The digital images of the Bridgeport Evening Farmer are now included in the Library of Congress’ newspaper site: Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/.

The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Board selected the period of 1909-1922 because it includes news about such topics as the effects of the First World War in Connecticut, Progressivism, urbanization, industrialization, the birth of the labor movement, and immigrant life. In addition, the digitization of this period provides important documentation about social life, births, deaths, marriages, divorces, illnesses, accidents, high school affairs, and other events of daily life. The Bridgeport Evening Farmer covered not only Bridgeport proper but towns west to Stamford and north into the Naugatuck Valley.

Having access to this newspaper online will be of special interest to those studying the World War I mobilization in Connecticut, as Bridgeport was the site of major munitions manufacture, as well as wartime labor campaigns for the eight-hour work day, higher wages, and the preservation of skilled categories of work. The armaments industry brought thousands of immigrants from southern and eastern Europe to Bridgeport’s factories and in these papers researchers will find news of their life in the factory, at home, and “on the town.” More issues will be added this spring and summer to complete the run from 1909-1922 and will include the Bridgeport Times and Evening Farmer for 1918-1922 and the weekly Republican Farmer for 1918-1920.

This summer we’ll also add 1909 for our other title, the Norwich Bulletin, bringing that run to 1909-1922 as well. See all our CT newspapers at Chronicling America http://1.usa.gov/1MGXmtZ The project website http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/encourages teachers to use newspapers as primary source material, illustrates for genealogists the scope of local news in these newspapers, and features blog entries about the wide variety of topics to be found in the newspapers. The Connecticut State Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut. The State Library provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services for citizens of Connecticut, as well as for the employees and officials of all three branches of State government. Our mission is to preserve and make accessible Connecticut’s history and heritage to advance the development of library services statewide. Visit the State Library at www.ctstatelibrary.org|

The National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov. See also the National Digital Newspaper Program http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-pro… Grants support the creation of a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1836 and 1922, from all states and U.S. territories.

————————————————————————————-

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

October 9, 2014

Contact: Gail Hurley (860) 704-2222 Gail.Hurley@ct.gov

Contact : Jane Cullinane (860)757-6524 Jane.Cullinane@ct.gov .

Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project Digitizes Norwich Bulletin 1914-1916

The Connecticut State Library is pleased to announce that it has digitized the Norwich Bulletin from January 1, 1914 – December 31, 1916 as part of a grant received from the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2013 to digitize historically significant Connecticut newspapers. The digital images of the Norwich Bulletin are now included in the Library of Congress’ newspaper site: Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/. Browse the Norwich Bulletin at http://1.usa.gov/1vwIJO6.

This grant allows Connecticut to add 100,000 pages, digitized from microfilm of newspapers published in the state between 1836 and 1922. The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Board selected the Norwich Bulletin, Bridgeport Evening Farmer and its successor publication, the Bridgeport Times and Evening Farmer for the time period of 1910-1922. These papers will provide news about such topics as the effects of WWI in Connecticut, information about social life, births, marriages, divorces, illnesses, the return of veterans, accidents, and deaths, information about labor, industrialization and immigration.

The remaining content from the time period chosen for the Norwich Bulletin and Bridgeport Evening Farmer will be added to Chronicling America on an ongoing basis through 2014 and 2015.

The Connecticut State Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut. The State Library provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services for citizens of Connecticut, as well as for the employees and officials of all three branches of State government. Our mission is to preserve and make accessible Connecticut’s history and heritage to advance the development of library services statewide. Visit the State Library at www.ctstatelibrary.org | http://www.museumofcthistory.org/ | http://twitter.com/LibraryofCt | http://www.facebook.com/CtStateLibrary | http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctarchives/

The National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov. National Digital Newspaper Program http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-pro… Grants support the creation of a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1836 and 1922, from all states and U.S. territories.

Robert W. Kinney Outreach Services Librarian Connecticut State Library 231 Capitol Ave. Hartford, CT 06106 860-757-6668 FAX: 860-757-6503 Robert.Kinney@ct.gov www.ctstatelibrary.org

————————————————————————————

Connecticut State Library Announces Newspaper Titles to be Digitized

[Originally posted on 01/28/2014]

The Connecticut State Library is pleased to announce that it has chosen two newspaper titles to be digitized as a result of an award for $274,034 from the National Endowment for the Humanities of a two-year National Digital Newspaper Program grant to digitize historically significant Connecticut newspapers. The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Board selected the Bridgeport Evening Farmer and its successor publication, the Bridgeport Times and Evening Farmer, as well as the Norwich Bulletin for the time period of 1910-1922. The two cities whose papers we are covering were centers for many of the major early 20th century historical changes affecting Connecticut: industrialization, immigration, urbanization, the labor movement, defense production, the red scare, prohibition and women’s suffrage.

As the centennial of WWI is approaching, these papers will also provide news about the effects of WWI in Connecticut. The digital images will be included in the Library of Congress’ newspaper site: Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/.

“Newspapers really are the “first draft of history,” noted State Historian and UConn professor Walter Woodward. “Having access to daily papers from two major Connecticut industrial centers for the pivotal years surrounding World War I will be a great asset to everyone interested in our state’s past.” The newspapers will also be of interest to students of local and family history.

The Bulletin includes a treasure trove of information about social life, births, marriages, divorces, illnesses, the return of veterans, accidents, and deaths. The two Bridgeport newspapers cover the activity of the tens of thousands of immigrant and native-born workers organizing unions and other political organizations, interviewing both leaders and members of the rank and file.

State Librarian Kendall Wiggin said that “as the major repository of Connecticut Newspapers, the State Library is committed to broadening access to these important resources.” He added that “with this announcement, the State Library is taking a giant step toward unlocking our newspaper collection for anyone with access to the Internet.” The State Library has already worked with digitizing newspapers, with our project called Newspapers of Connecticut http://is.gd/Oy4T68. This has short runs of 86 titles from 1821-1929, for a total of 3,301 issues from 31 towns.

————————————————————————————

Connecticut State Library Receives Grant for Newspaper Digitization

[Originally posted on 8/20/2013]

The Connecticut State Library is pleased to announce that it has received an award of $274,034 from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a two-year National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) grant to digitize historically significant Connecticut newspapers. The digital images will be included in the Library of Congress’ newspaper site: Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/.

Following the NDNP guidelines, the $274,034 grant will allow Connecticut to add 100,000 pages, digitized from microfilm of newspapers published in the state between 1836 and 1922. An advisory committee consisting of an historian, journalist, educator, librarian, and archivist will select the newspapers to be scanned.

“This is a great honor for Connecticut – a state where newspapers have always been important,” said State Librarian Kendall Wiggin. Wiggin noted that while Connecticut boasts the nation’s oldest continuously published newspaper, the Courant, by 1875, there were 78 newspapers being published in the state, including 17 dailies and 51 weeklies. This project builds upon the earlier Connecticut Newspaper Project (1991-2002) which inventoried the state’s newspaper repositories, cataloged the newspapers and preserved over 1,000,000 pages of 437 newspapers on microfilm.

The State Library has already worked with digitizing newspapers through its Newspapers of Connecticut project http://is.gd/Oy4T68. This has short runs of 86 titles from 1821-1929, for a total of 3,243 issues from 31 towns. John N. Barry, Chair of the State Library Board noted that “This grant will allow the State Library to continue its work in providing easier access to the significant issues and events of our history. Connecticut’s newspapers are irreplaceable sources of obtaining knowledge, and this digitization grant will continue the modernization of preserving Connecticut’s rich history.”

The Connecticut State Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut. The State Library provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services for citizens of Connecticut, as well as for the employees and officials of all three branches of State government. Our mission is to preserve and make accessible Connecticut’s history and heritage to advance the development of library services statewide. Visit the State Library at www.ctstatelibrary.org | http://www.museumofcthistory.org/ | http://twitter.com/LibraryofCt | http://www.facebook.com/CtStateLibrary | http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctarchives/

The National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov. National Digital Newspaper Program http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-pro… Grants support the creation of a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1836 and 1922, from all states and U.S. territories.

Follow CT DNP
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join other Connecticut Digital Newspaper followers.
Powered By WPFruits.com